Authors

The science of Planet Four is made possible by the work of our volunteers. These are all the Planet Four volunteers who contributed to the project's first paper and gave us permission to publish their names:

Results

This page allows anyone to download the data files associated with Planet Four papers. Planet Four is described in Aye et al. (in press) . Anyone making use of Planet Four data should cite this paper in any resulting publications as well as the appropriate data release paper.

Data Release 1

Planet Four: Probing Springtime Winds on Mars by Mapping the Southern Polar CO2 Jet Deposits

K.-Michael Aye, Megan E. Schwamb, Ganna Portyankina, Candice J. Hansen, Adam McMaster, Grant R.M. Miller, Brian Carstensen, Christopher Snyder, Michael Parrish, Stuart Lynn, Chuhong Mai, David Miller, Robert J. Simpson, & Arfon M. Smith, Planet Four: Probing Springtime Winds on Mars by Mapping the Southern Polar CO2 Jet Deposits, Icarus,in press (pre-print version) Abstract: The springtime sublimation process of Mars’ southern seasonal polar CO2 ice cap features dark fan-shaped deposits appearing on the top of the thawing ice sheet. The fan material likely originates from the surface below the ice sheet, brought up via CO2 jets breaking through the seasonal ice cap. Once the dust and dirt is released into the atmosphere, the material may be blown by the surface winds into the dark streaks visible from orbit. The location, size and direction of these fans record a number of parameters important to quantifying seasonal winds and sublimation activity, the most important agent of geological change extant on Mars. We present results of a systematic mapping of these south polar seasonal fans with the Planet Four online citizen science project. Planet Four enlists the general public to map the shapes, directions, and sizes of the seasonal fans visible in orbital images. Over 80,000 volunteers have contributed to the Planet Four project, reviewing 221 images, from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter’s HiRISE (High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment) camera, taken in southern spring during Mars Years 29 and 30. We provide an overview of Planet Four and detail the processes of combining multiple volunteer assessments together to generate a high fidelity catalog of ∼400,000 south polar seasonal fans. We present the results from analyzing the wind directions at several locations monitored by HiRISE over two Mars years, providing new insights into polar surface winds.
  1. Fan catalog: The resulting fan object catalog for MRO HiRISE seasons 2 and 3 (MY29 and 30), with an applied probability cut of 0.5, i.e. when half or more volunteers have marked an object as fan, it enters this catalog.
  2. Blotch catalog: The resulting blotch object catalog for MRO HiRISE seasons 2 and 3 (MY29 and 30), with an applied probability cut of 0.5, i.e. when less than half of volunteers have marked an object as fan, it enters this catalog (starting with a catalog that only has fans and blotches).
  3. HiRISE observation catalog: This file contains metadata for all HiRISE observations that were used for this catalog.
  4. Planet Four tile catalog: This file contains data to locate all Planet Four tiles on a Mars map, using either Mars-centered fixed frame coordinates, or latitude and longitude.
  5. Raw data: Planet Four raw classification data that was used in our reduction pipeline to create the fan and blotch catalog that is linked on this page (described in Appendix C of the paper, linked below). User names have been anonymized for data privacy.
  6. Intermediate data products: These are the products as described in Appendix D of the paper, linked below. A researcher can apply a different cut on the probability of fan vs blotch identification using these products, reproducing a new fan catalog.
More details about the structure of these files can be found in Appendices C to E . We acknowledge the contributions of the Planet Four volunteer community to this work here.

Planet Four

Through Planet Four, Zooniverse volunteers mapped seasonal fans on the south polar region of Mars, providing new insights into the seasonal processes and weather active on the Red Planet.

This project is paused while we are working on a new version of Planet Four utilizing the Zooniverse’s latest web platform. Check back soon for updates.

In the meantime, please help map the exotic terrains of Mars' south pole with Planet Four: Terrains or help map polygonal ridges on Mars with Planet Four: Ridges.

Publications »

Zooniverse »

Blog »

Discussion Forum »